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Quarter 2; Unit 3: Operations and Algebraic Thinking

Common Core Standards covered in Unit 3:

heartUnderstand addition as putting together and adding to, and understand subtraction as taking apart and taking from.
K.OA.1 Represent addition and subtraction with objects, fingers, mental images, drawings, sounds (e.g. Claps) acting out situations, verbal explanations, expressions or equations
K.OA.2 Solve addition and subtraction word problems and add/subtract within 10 (e.g. by using objects or drawing to represent the problem)
K.OA.3 Decompose numbers less than or equal to 10 into pairs in more than one way, e.g., by using objects or drawings, and record each decomposition by a drawing or equation (e.g., 5 = 2 + 3 and 5 = 4 + 1).
K.OA.4 For any number from 1 to 9, find the number that makes 10 when added to the given number, e.g., by using objects or drawings, and record the answer with a drawing or equation.
K.OA.5 Fluently add and subtract within 5. (Focus: with objects and drawings) 
 
 
 
add/addition compare
compose decompose
difference drawing
equal to equations
expressions minus
objects pairs
plus separate
set subtract/subtraction
sum minuend
subtrahend take away
put together addend


Enduring Understanding (Big Ideas):
Enduring understandings go beyond discrete facts or skills. They focus on larger concepts, principles, or processes. They are transferable and apply to new situations within or beyond the subject.
  • There are multiple representations for any number when adding whole numbers
  • Operations create relationships between numbers.
  • The relationship among the operations and their properties promote computational fluency.
  • The context of a problem determines the reasonableness of a solution.
  • Numerical values do not have to be assigned to a quantity in order to be compared.
  • Numbers can be decomposed or composed into part-whole relationships. 
Websites to support instruction:
  • Common Core State Standards
http://www.corestandards.org/assets/CCSSI_Math%20Standards.pdf
 
  • Addition to 10:
    http://www.lessonplanspage.com/mathadditionsubtraction-htm/
 
  • Sorting By Attributes
http://www.kindergartenkindergarten.com/sorting-by-attributes
 
  • Sorting And Classifying
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Mu00niMcpQE
 
  • Addition Song
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=INHYb1RNaMM
 
  • Snake Addition
http://frompond.blogspot.com.au/2014/05/snake-addition-and-friends-
 
Literature Connection:
  • What’s New at the Zoo by Suzanne Slade
?
  • The Mission of Addition by Brian Cleary
?
 
  • Seaweed Soup by Stuart J. Murphy
?
  • Five Creatures by Emily Jenkins
?
  • Ten Black Dots by Donald Crews
?
  • Ten Flashing Fireflies by Philemon Struges
?
  • Cubes, Cones, Cylinders, and Spheres by Tana Hoban
  • The Shape of Things by Dayle Ann Dodds 

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Unit 2: Counting, Writing & Comparing Numbers, Geometry, Measurement & Data


Common Core Standards covered in Unit 2

heartKnow number names and the count sequence.
K.CC.1 Count to 100 by ones and by tens. (Focus: 0 – 50 by ones – 0 – 50 by tens)

K.CC.3 Write numbers from 0 to 20. Represent a number of objects with a written numeral 0-20 (with 0 representing a count of no objects). (Focus: 0 – 10)

heartCount to tell the number of objects.
K.CC.4a
When counting objects, say the number names in the standard order, pairing each object with one and only one number name and each number name with one and only one object.

K.CC.4b Understand that the last number name said tells the number of objects counted. The number of objects is the same regardless of their arrangement or the order in which they were counted.
K.CC.4c Understand that each successive number name refers to a quantity that is one larger.
K.CC.5 Count to answer “how many?” questions about as many as 20 things arranged in a line, a rectangular array, or a circle, or as many as 10 things in a scattered configuration; given a number from 1-20, count out that many objects. Focus: (0 – 10)

 
heartCompare numbers.
K.CC.6 Identify whether the number of objects in one group is greater than, less than, or equal to the number of objects in another group, e.g., by using matching and counting strategies (Include groups with up to ten objects).

K.CC.7 Compare two numbers between 1 and 10 presented as written numerals. Focus: (0 – 10)

 







heartClassify objects and count the number of objects in each category.
K.MD.3 Classify objects into given categories; count the number of objects in each category and sort the categories by count. (Limit category counts to be less than or equal to 10).
 
heartIdentify and describe shapes (squares, circles, triangles, rectangles, hexagons, cubes, cones, cylinders and spheres.)
K.G.1 Describe objects in the environment using names of shapes, and describe the relative positions of these objects using terms such as above, below, beside, in front of, behind, and next to.
K.G.2 Correctly name shapes regardless of their orientations or overall size.
K.G.3 Identify shapes as two-dimensional (lying in a plane, “flat”) or three-dimensional (“solid”). 

 
arrangement count equal to  greater than
less than more next numerals/numbers
objects order ones quantity
rectangular array set standard order tens
above below beside sides
corners sort classify alike
different squares circles triangles
rectangles hexagons cubes cones
cylinders spheres in front of  behind
next to      
 

Enduring Understanding (Big Ideas):
Enduring understandings go beyond discrete facts or skills. They focus on larger concepts, principles, or processes. They are transferable and apply to new situations within or beyond the subject.
  • Count with understanding and recognize “how many” in a set of objects.
  • Counting by one means adding one more to a number.
  • Counting by tens means adding ten more to a number.
  • Zero represents an empty set and the least whole number.
  • Numbers come before or after a specific number.
  • When counting, the last number word you say tells the number of items in the set. Counting a set in a different order does not change the total.
  • When counting, one number word means one object (one to one correspondence).
  • Numbers can represent quantity, position, location, and relationship.
  • Numbers can be represented using objects, words, and symbols.
  • Numbers are classified and compared within our number system; five and ten can be benchmarks.
  • When comparing objects in sets, one set will have more, less, or both will be equal.
  • Count with understanding and recognize “how many” in a set of objects.
  • Shapes and objects can be identified by their attributes.
  • Color, orientation, and overall size do not define the shapes.
  • Concepts of similarities are used to relate and compare 2 and 3-D shapes.
  • Similarity is not dependent on orientation.
  • Geometry helps us describe, represent, and make sense of our environment. Shapes are everywhere.
  • Shapes have sides and corners which can be counted.
  • Objects can be similar to others in one way and different in other ways. 
Websites to support instruction:
Common Core State Standards
http://www.corestandards.org/assets/CCSSI_Math%20Standards.pdf
 
Identify Shapes, Classify and Count Pizza
http://thefirstgradefairytales.blogspot.com/2013/11/math-monday-linky-shape-pizzas-freebie.html
 
Roll and Color Shapes
http://www.playdoughtoplato.com/roll-color-shapes/
 
Counting to tell number (Apple Seeds)
http://fromabcstoacts.com/apple-seed-counting
 
Comparing Numbers with Animals
http://www.stirthewonder.com/counting-less-farm-animal-rainbow-counters/
 
Counting practice (Counting mats)
http://www.themeasuredmom.com/printable-counting-mat-fill-the-dump-truck/
 
Building Number Sense
http://thankgoditsfirstgrade.blogspot.com/2014/09/building-number-sense-in-kindergarten.html?m=1
 
Counting Rhymes
http://www.k-5mathteachingresources.com/counting-rhymes.html
 
Make and Count slices of pizza
http://www.activity-mom.com/2012/02/pizza-math.html
 
Cheerios Counting Activity
http://www.lessonplanspage.com/mathcountingusingthecheerioscountingbookideak-htm/

 
Literature Connection:
• 10 Black Dots by Donald Crews

• Sheep in a Jeep by Nancy Shaw

• Rooster’s Off to See the World by Eric Carle

• 12 Ways to Get to 11 by Eve Merriman

• Fish Eyes by Lois Ehlert

• Mouse Count by Ellen Walsh

• The Button Box by Margarette S. Reid

• Sorting (Math Counts) by Henry Pluckrose

• Gray Rabbit’s Odd One Out by Alan Baker


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Unit 1: Counting, Writing & Comparing

Numbers, Geometry, Measurement & Data


               Common Core Standards covered in Unit 1

heart Know number names and the count sequence.


• K.CC.1 Count to 100 by ones and by tens.
  (Focus: 0 – 25 by ones)
• K.CC.3 Write numbers from 0 to 20. Represent a number of objects with a written numeral 0-20 (with 0 representing a count of no objects). (Focus: 0 – 5)


heart Count to tell the number of objects.
• K.CC.4a When counting objects, say the number names in the standard order, pairing each object with one and only one n
umber nameand each number name with one and only one object.
• K.CC.4b Understand that the last number name said tells the number of objects counted. 
The number of objects is the same regardless of their arrangement or the order in which they were counted.
• K.CC.4c Understand that each successive number name refers to a quantity that is one l
arger.
• K.CC.5 Count to answer “how many?” questions about as many as 20 things arranged in a line, a rectangular array, or a 
 ircle, or as many as 10 things in a scattered configuration; given a number from 1-20, count out that many objects.


 

heart Compare numbers.

• K.CC.6 Identify whether the number of objects in one group is greater than, less than, or equal to the number of objects in another group, e.g., by using matching and counting strategies (Include groups with upto tenobjects).
• K.C
C.7 Compare two numbers between 1 and 10 presented as written numerals. (Focus: 0 – 5)

heartClassify objects and count the number of objects in each category.
• K.MD.3 Classify objects into given categories; count the number of objects in each category and sort the categories by count. (Limit category counts to be less than or equal to 10).
 
heartIdentify anddescribe shapes (squares, circles, triangles,?rectangles, hexagons, cubes, cones,cylinders and spheres.)
• K.G.1 Describe objects in the environment using names of shapes, and describe the relative positions of these objects using terms such as above, below, beside, in front of, behind, and next to.
• K.G.2 Correctly name shapes regardless of their orientations or overall size.
• K.G.3 Identify shapes as two-dimensional (lying in a plane, “flat”) or three-dimensional (“solid”).


 
 



Mathematical Language that will be used in Unit 1
 
Arrangement Count Equal to
Greater Than Less Than More
Next Numeras/Numbers Objects
Order Ones Quantity
Rectangular Array Set Standard Order
Sides Corners Sort
Classify Alike Different
Rectangles Circles Triangles
Rectangles Hexagons Cubes
Cones Cylinders Spheres

 

Enduring Understanding (Big Ideas):
Enduring understandings go beyond discrete facts or skills. They focus on larger concepts, principles, or processes. They are transferable and apply to new situations within or beyond the subject.
 Count with understanding and recognize “how many” in a set of objects.
• Counting by one means adding one more to a number.
• Zero represents an empty set and the least whole number.
• Numbers come before or after a specific number.
• When counting, the last number word you say tells the number of items in the set.    
    Counting a set in a different order does not change the total.
• When counting, one number word means one object (one to one correspondence).
• Numbers can represent quantity, position, location, and relationship.
• Numbers can be represented using objects, words, and symbols.
• Numbers are classified and compared within our number system; five and ten can
  be benchmarks.
• When comparing objects in sets, one set will have more, less, or both will be  
  equal.
• Count with understanding and recognize “how many” in a set of objects.
• Shapes and objects can be sorted by their attributes.
• Shapes and geometric figures can be identified by their attributes.
• Similarity is not dependent on orientation.
• Color, orientation, and overall size do not define the shapes.
• Geometry helps us describe, represent, and make sense of our environment. Shapes are everywhere.
• Shapes have sides and corners which can be counted.
• Objects can be similar to others in one way and different in other ways.
• Some shapes are flat (2 dimensional) while other shapes are solid (3 dimensional).
• Smaller shapes can be used to make larger shapes and larger shapes can be made from smaller shapes

 
 
Websites that support Unit 1:
 
 
Songs:

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  Website updated on: Wednesday, January 17, 2018  
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