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Grade 1, Quarter 2
Unit 3: Counting, Place Value, & Geometry

Common Core Standards:
 heartExtend the counting sequence.
1.NBT.1 Count to 120, starting at any number less than 120. In this range, read and write numerals and represent a number of objects with a written numeral.
 
heartUnderstand place value.
1.NBT.2 Understand that two digits of a two-digit number represent amounts of tens and ones. Understand the following as special cases:
1.NBT. 2a 10 can be thought of as a bundle of ten ones — called a ?ten.?
1.NBT.2b The numbers from 11 to 19 are composed of a ten and one, two, three, four, five, six, seven, eight, or nine ones.
1.NBT.2c The numbers 10, 20, 30, 40, 50, 60, 70, 80, 90 refer to one, two, three, four, five, six, seven, eight, or nine tens (and 0 ones).
1.NBT.3 Compare two two-digit numbers based on meanings of the tens and ones digits, recording the results of comparisons with the symbols >, =, and <.

 
heartRepresent and solve problems involving addition and subtraction.
1.OA.2. Solve word problems that call for addition of three whole numbers whose sum is less than or equal to 20, e.g., by using objects, drawings, and equations with a symbol for the unknown number to represent the problem.
 
heartUnderstand and apply properties of operations and the relationship between addition and subtraction.
1.OA.3 Apply properties of operations as strategies to add and subtract. Examples: If 8 + 3 = 11 is known, then 3 + 8 = 11, is also known. (Commutative property of addition.) To add 2 + 6 + 4, the second two numbers can be added to make a ten, so 2 + 6 + 4 = 2 + 10 = 12. (Associative property of addition.)
 
heartWork with addition and subtraction equations.
1.OA.7 Understand the meaning of the equal sign, and determine if equations involving addition and subtraction are true or false. For example, which of the following equations are true and which are false? 6 = 6, 7 = 8-1, 5 + 2 = 2 + 5, 4 + 1 = 5 + 2.
1.OA.8 Determine the unknown whole number in addition or subtraction equation relating 3 whole numbers. For example determine the unknown number that makes the equation true in each of the equations 8+? = 11; 5 = ___ - 3; 6 + 6 =___. 
Addend  Addition  Associative  Bundle  Commutative
Compare  Compose Cone Count Count back
Count up Counting on Cube Decompose Digit
Equal signs  Equations False Fives Groups
Number line Numeral Ones Place Value Subtraction
Tens Ten True Whole  
 
Enduring Understanding (Big Ideas):
Enduring understandings go beyond discrete facts or skills. They focus on larger concepts, principles, or processes. They are transferable and apply to new situations within or beyond the subject.
  • The location of a number in the place value chart is the determining factor in what the digit represents.
  • Numbers larger than 10 can be represented in terms of tens and ones.
  • Sets of tens can be perceived as single sets. The sets can be counted in different ways. For example, 2 tens can be used to describe 20 single objects using the base-ten approach.
  • Place value leads to number sense and efficient strategies for computation.
  • Equal means being of the same size, quantity, or value.
  • Understand the meaning of the symbols <, >, and =.
  • Addition and subtraction are inverse operations.
  • Flexible methods of computation involve taking apart and combining numbers in a wide variety of ways (adding on, doubles, doubles +1, doubles -1, making tens, etc.).
  • Missing addends may be represented by a variety of symbols (ex. question mark, blank, box, circle, etc.).
  • Understand addition as putting together and adding to count, and understand subtraction as taking apart.
  • Number relationships provide the foundation for strategies that help students remember basic facts. 
?

 
Prior Knowledge:
 
What should my child know before he/she starts this unit?
  • Compose and decompose numbers.
  • Count forward to 100 from any given number.
  • Count to 100 by ones and tens.
  • Understand one-to-one correspondence.
  • Count to answer ?how many?.
  • Solve addition and subtraction word problems, and add and subtract within 10.
  • Beginning with any number 1 – 9, find the number that makes 10.
  • Fluently add and subtract within 5.
  • Compare two numbers between 1 and 10 presented as written numerals.
  • Identify whether the number of objects in one group is greater than, less than, or equal to the number of objects in another group by using matching or counting strategies. 
 
Literature Connection:
  • One Less Fish by Allan Sheather
  • Ten Terrible Dinosaurs by Paul Strickland
  • One More Bunny by Rick Walton
  • Twenty is Too Many by Kate Duke
  • Monster Musical Chairs by Stuart J. Murphy
  • Turtle Splash by Cathryn Falwell
  • Ready, Set, Hop by Stuart J. Murphy
  • The Candy Counting Book by McCourt
  • Monster Math by Anne Miranda
  • 100 Days of School by Trudy Harris
  • A String of Beads by Margarette S. Reid
  • Ten Rosy Roses by Eve Merriam
  • Pizza Counting by Christina Dobson
  • 100th Day Worries by Margery Cuyler
  • One Hundred Hungry Ants by Elinor J. Pinczes
  • Round is a Mooncake: A Book About Shapes by Roseanne Thong
  • A Cloak for the Dreamer by Aileen Friedman
  • Color Zoo by Lois Ehlert
  • Let’s Fly a Kiteby Stuart J. Murphy
  • The Best Bug Parade by Stuart J. Murphy
  • Nine O’Clock Lullaby by Marilyn Singer 
 
----------------------------------------------------------------------
Grade 1,
Unit 2: Properties of Addition and Subtraction & Fluency 

 
Common Core Standards covered in Unit 2:
heartUnderstand and apply properties of operations and the relationship between addition and subtraction.
1.OA.4 Understand subtraction as an unknown addend problem. For example, subtract 10 - 8 by finding the number that makes 10 when added to 8.
 
heartAdd and subtract within 20.
1.OA.5 Relate counting to addition and subtraction. Ex. by counting on 2 to add 2.
1.OA.6 Add and subtract within 20, demonstrating fluency for addition and subtraction within 10. Use strategies such as counting on; making ten (e.g., 8 + 6 = 8 + 2 + 4 = 10 + 4 = 14); decomposing a number leading to a ten (e.g., 13 – 4 = 13 – 3 – 1 = 10 – 1 = 9); using the relationship between addition and subtraction (e.g., knowing that 8 + 4 = 12, one knows 12 – 8 = 4); and creating equivalent but easier or known sums (e.g., adding 6 + 7 by creating the known equivalent 6 + 6 + 1 = 12 + 1 = 13).

 
heartReason with shapes and their attributes.
1.G.1 Distinguish between defining attributes (e.g., triangles are closed and three-sided) versus non-defining attributes (e.g., color, orientation, overall size); build and draw shapes to possess defining attributes.
1.G.2 Compose two-dimensional shapes (rectangles, squares, trapezoids, triangles, half-circles, and quarter-circles) or three-dimensional shapes (cubes, right rectangular prisms, right circular cones, and right circular cylinders) to create a composite shape, and compose new shapes from the composite shape. 
 
addend attribute addition
circle compose cone
count count back count on
count up cube cylindar
Decompose Defining Attributes differences      
digits equal to minuend
Non-Defining Attributes number number line
numeral ones quadrilaterals
rectangular prism regular facts subtraction
subtrahend sums ten
tens triangle  

Enduring Understanding (Big Ideas):
Enduring understandings go beyond discrete facts or skills. They focus on larger concepts, principles, or processes. They are transferable and apply to new situations within or beyond the subject.
  • Addition and subtraction are inverse operations.
  • Flexible methods of computation involve taking apart and combining numbers in a wide variety of ways (adding on, doubles, doubles +1, doubles -1, making tens, etc.).
  • Missing addends may be represented by a variety of symbols (ex. question mark, blank, box, circle, etc.).
  • Understand addition as putting together and adding to count, and understand subtraction as taking apart.
  • Number relationships provide the foundation for strategies that help students remember basic facts.
  • A shape’s characteristics (e.g., triangles are closed and three-sided) are used for identification.
  • Color, orientation, and overall size do not define shapes.
  • Three-dimensional shapes are combinations of two-dimensional shapes.
  • Two-dimensional shapes may be composed of many different shapes.
  • The properties of shapes make them alike or different.
  • Some shapes have sides, angles, and faces which can be counted.
  • Patterns can be created, extended, and transferred through the use of geometric shapes.
  • Location of shapes can be described using positional words.
  • Equal means being of the same size. 
 

 
Prior Knowledge:

What should my child know before he/she starts this unit?
  • Represent addition and subtraction with objects, fingers, mental images, drawings, sounds, (e.g., claps), acting-out situations, verbal explanations, expressions, or equations.
  • Solve addition and subtraction word problems, and add and subtract within 10, e.g., by using objects or drawings to represent the problem.
  • Decompose numbers less than or equal to 10 into pairs in more than one way, e.g., by using objects or drawings, and record each decomposition by a drawing or equation (e.g., 5 = 2 + 3 and 5 = 4 + 1).
  • For any number from 1 to 9, find the number that makes 10 when added to the given number, e.g., by using objects or drawings, and record the answer with a drawing or equation.
  • Fluently add and subtract within 5.
  • Solve addition and subtraction problems to 19 using manipulatives.
  • Model situations that involve the addition and subtraction of whole numbers, using objects, pictures, and symbols.
  • Compose and decompose numbers to nineteen.
  • Model situations that involve the addition and subtraction of whole numbers, using objects, pictures, and symbols.
  • Compose simple shapes to form larger shapes.
  • Compare two and three dimensional objects, using sides and vertices.
  • Identify two-dimensional and three dimensional shapes.
  • Describe two-dimensional and three dimensional shapes in the environment.
  • Correctly name shapes.
 
Literature Connection:
  • One Less Fish by Allan Sheather
  • Ten Terrible Dinosaurs by Paul Strickland
  • One More Bunny by Rick Walton
  • Twenty is Too Many by Kate Duke
  • Monster Musical Chairs by Stuart J. Murphy
  • Turtle Splash by Cathryn Falwell
  • Ready, Set, Hop by Stuart J. Murphy
  • The Candy Counting Book by McCourt
  • Monster Math by Anne Miranda
  • 100 Days of School by Trudy Harris
  • A String of Beads by Margarette S. Reid
  • Ten Rosy Roses by Eve Merriam
  • Pizza Counting by Christina Dobson
  • 100th Day Worries by Margery Cuyler
  • One Hundred Hungry Ants by Elinor J. Pinczes
  • Round is a Mooncake: A Book About Shapes by Roseanne Thong
  • A Cloak for the Dreamer by Aileen Friedman
  • Color Zoo by Lois Ehlert
  • Let’s Fly a Kiteby Stuart J. Murphy
  • The Best Bug Parade by Stuart J. Murphy
  • Nine O’Clock Lullaby by Marilyn Singer 
Websites to support instruction:
 
Common Core State Standards
 
Addition
http://www.coolmath-games.com/0-feed-fribbit-addition/index.html
 
Addition Word Problems
http://www.ixl.com/math/grade-1/word-problems-adding-three-numbers
 
Various Operation Games
http://www.softschools.com/math/games/mgame2.jsp
 
Addition & Subtraction Virtual Game
http://illuminations.nctm.org/ActivityDetail.aspx?ID=198
 
Place Value
http://www.softschools.com/math/place_value/games/tens_and_ones/
 
Ordering Numbers
http://www.softschools.com/math/ordering_numbers/
 
Shape Concentration
http://illuminations.nctm.org/ActivityDetail.aspx?ID=73
 
Solid Shape Factory
http://www.harcourtschool.com/activity/solid_figure_factory/
 
Virtual Geoboard
http://www.mathlearningcenter.org/web-apps/geoboard/
 
Count on to Subtract
https://learnzillion.com/lesson_plans/3952-10-count-on-to-solve-subtraction-situations-in-the-context-of-data-a
 
Solving Addition Word Problems
https://learnzillion.com/lesson_plans/3396-6-use-addition-strategies-to-solve-word-problems-a
 
Solve Addition Equations
https://learnzillion.com/lesson_plans/3383-7-understand-that-different-strategies-can-be-used-to-solve-addition-equations-c
 
Count on Using a Number Line
https://learnzillion.com/lesson_plans/9497-8-use-a-number-line-to-count-on-fp
 
First Grade Math Games
https://www.ixl.com/math/grade-1
 
Shapes

https://learnzillion.com/resources/64126-distinguishing-attributes-of-shapes
 
Addition Word Problem Game
http://www.math4children.com/games-k-to-6/1st%20grade/addition%20word%20problems/index.html
 
Solve Addition Problems
https://learnzillion.com/resources/64138-applying-properties-of-operations-to-solve-addition-problems
 
First Grade Common Core Math Games
http://www.mathplayground.com/common_core_state_standards_for_mathematics_grade_1.html
 
Very Hungry Caterpillar Task (Tens and Ones)
https://www.illustrativemathematics.org/content-standards/1/NBT/B/2/tasks/115
 
Addition and Subtraction Strategies
https://learnzillion.com/resources/64125-developing-addition-and-subtraction-strategies


End of Unit 2...

---------------------------------------------------------
Grade 1 / Unit 1: Addition, Subtraction & Fluency


Common Core Standards covered within Unit 1:

heartExtend the counting sequence.
• 1.NBT.1 Count to 120, starting at any number less than 120. In this range, read
and write numerals and represent a number of objects with a written numeral.

heartRepresent and solve problems involving addition and subtraction.
• 1.OA.1 Use addition and subtraction within 20 to solve word problems involving situations of adding to, taking from, putting together, taking apart, and comparing, with unknowns in all positions, e.g., by using objects, drawings, and equations with a symbol for the unknown number to represent the problem.
 
heartAdd and subtract within 20.
• 1.OA.5 Relate counting to add and sub. Ex. by counting on 2 to add 2.
• 1.OA.6 Add and subtract within 20, demonstrating fluency for addition and subtraction within 10. Use strategies such as counting on; making ten (e.g., 8 + 6 = 8 + 2 + 4 = 10 + 4 = 14); decomposing a number leading to a ten (e.g., 13 – 4 = 13 – 3 – 1 = 10 – 1 = 9); using the relationship between addition and subtraction (e.g., knowing that 8 + 4 = 12, one knows 12 – 8 = 4); and creating equivalent but easier or known sums (e.g., adding 6 + 7 by creating the known equivalent 6 + 6 + 1 = 12 + 1 = 13).
 
Mathematical Language:Vocbulary for Unit 1
Addend Addition
Associative Property Bundle
Commutative Property Compose
Count  Count Back
Count Up Counting On
Decompose Differences
Digit Doubles
Equal To Groups
Number Numeral
Ones Place Value
Related Facts Subtraction
Subtrahend Sum
Ten Tens
                          
 

Enduring Understanding (Big Ideas):
Enduring understandings go beyond discrete facts or skills. They focus on larger concepts, principles, or processes. They are transferable and apply to new situations within or beyond the subject.
• The location of a number in the place value chart is the determining factor in what the digit represents.
• Numbers larger than 10 can be represented in terms of tens and ones.
• Place value leads to number sense and efficient strategies for computation.
• Addition and subtraction are inverse operations.
• Flexible methods of computation involve taking apart and combining numbers in a wide variety of ways (adding on, doubles, doubles +1, doubles -1, making tens, etc.).
• Missing addends may be represented by a variety of symbols (i.e. question mark, blank, box, circle, etc.)
• Understand addition is putting together and adding to count and understand subtraction as taking apart.
• Number relationships provide the foundation for strategies that help students remember basic facts.


Prior K
nowledge:

What should my child know before he/she starts this unit?

• Represent addition and subtraction with objects, fingers, mental images, and drawings, sounds (e.g., claps), acting out situations, verbal explanations, expressions, or equations.
• Work with numbers 11-19 to gain foundations for place value.
• Model situations that involve the addition and subtraction of whole numbers, using objects,   pictures, and symbols.
• Know how to count forward to 100.
• Compose and decompose numbers to ten.
• Solve addition and subtraction problems to 10 using counters and other visible materials such as fingers and ten frames.
• Understand that two digit numbers are made of tens and ones.
• Model situations that involve the addition and subtraction of whole numbers, using objects, pictures, and symbols.
Literature Connection:
• One Less Fish by Allan Sheather

• Ten Terrible Dinosaurs by Paul Strickland

• One More Bunny by Rick Walton


• Twenty is Too Many by Kate Duke

• Monster Musical Chairs by Stuart J. Murphy

• Turtle Splash by Cathryn Falwell

• Ready, Set, Hop by Stuart J. Murphy


• The Candy Counting Book by McCourt

• Monster Math by Anne Miranda

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  Website updated on: Wednesday, January 17, 2018  
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