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Coming to morning Math and working on Prodigy will help students become much more skillful in Math.  They will also receive extra credit for coming to morning math and for working problems on Prodigy.


Students in 7th and 8th Grades have active assignments on IXL.  These assignments count as test grades so students should take these assignments very seriously.

Below is the lessons to be covered from April 16-20
 

Monday, April 16

 

Eighth Grade:

 

Students will explore scatter plots, lines of best fit, negative coorelation, positive coorelation, and no coorelation.

 

8.SP.A.1 Construct and interpret scatter plots for bivariate measurement data to investigate patterns of association between two quantities. Describe patterns such as clustering, outliers, positive or negative association, linear association, and nonlinear association. 8.SP.A.2 Know that straight lines are widely used to model relationships between two quantitative variables. For scatter plots that suggest a linear association, informally fit a straight line and informally assess the model fit by judging the closeness of the data points to the line. 8.SP.A.3 Use the equation of a linear model to solve problems in the context of bivariate measurement data, interpreting the slope and intercept. For example, in a linear model for a biology experiment, interpret a slope of 1.5 cm/hr as meaning that an additional hour of s

 

Eighth Grade R. T. I.

 

Students will review functions and systems of equations.

 

Seventh Grade:

 

Students will explore drawing and interpreting box and whisker graphs.

 

b. Know and relate the choice of measures of center (median and/or mean)and variability (range and/or interquartile range) to the shape of the data distribution and the context in which the data were gathered.

 

Homework for 7th and 8th Grades:  Minimum of 30 minutes doing IXL

Math

 

Tuesday, April 17

TNReady Testing

 

Short Class Rotations

 

Eighth Grade:

 

Students will be introduced to transformations on the coordinate plane.  They will explore translations and reflections.

 

8.G.A.1 Verify experimentally the properties of rotations, reflections, and translations: a. Lines are taken to lines, and line segments to line segments of the same length. b. Angles are taken to angles of the same measure. c. Parallel lines are taken to parallel lines. 8.G.A.2 Describe the effect of dilations, translations, rotations, and reflections on two-dimensional figures using coordinates.

 

Seventh Grade:

Students will explore finding the volume and surface area of isosceles triangular prisms.

 

7.G.B.5 Solve real-world and mathematical problems involving area, volume, and surface area of two- and three-dimensional objects composed of triangles, quadrilaterals, polygons, cubes, and right prisms.

 

Homework:  Both &th and 8th Grades are assigned to do a minimum of 30 minutes on IXL.

 

Wednesday, April 18

TNReady Testing

Short Class Rotations

 

Eighth Grade:

 

Students will explore doing 90, 180, and 270 degree rotations on the coordinate plane.

 

8.G.A.1 Verify experimentally the properties of rotations, reflections, and translations: a. Lines are taken to lines, and line segments to line segments of the same length. b. Angles are taken to angles of the same measure. c. Parallel lines are taken to parallel lines. 8.G.A.2 Describe the effect of dilations, translations, rotations, and reflections on two-dimensional figures using coordinates.

 

Seventh Grade:

 

Students will explore finding the volume and surface area of right triangular prisms.

 

7.G.B.5 Solve real-world and mathematical problems involving area, volume, and surface area of two- and three-dimensional objects composed of triangles, quadrilaterals, polygons, cubes, and right prisms.

 

Seventh and Eighth Grade Homework:  Students will do a minimum of 30 minutes on IXL

 

Thursday, April 19

TNReady Testing

Shorter Classes

 

Eighth Grade:

 

Students will explore 90, 180, and 270 degree rotations on the coordinate plane.

 

8.G.A.1 Verify experimentally the properties of rotations, reflections, and translations: a. Lines are taken to lines, and line segments to line segments of the same length. b. Angles are taken to angles of the same measure. c. Parallel lines are taken to parallel lines. 8.G.A.2 Describe the effect of dilations, translations, rotations, and reflections on two-dimensional figures using coordinates.

 

Seventh Grade:

 

Students will find the volume and surface area of pyramids.

 

7.G.B.5 Solve real-world and mathematical problems involving area, volume, and surface area of two- and three-dimensional objects composed of triangles, quadrilaterals, polygons, cubes, and right prisms.

 

Seventh and Eighth Grade Homework:  Students do at least 30 minutes on IXL.

 

Friday, April 20

 

Eighth Grade:

 

Students will explore dilations on the coordinate plane.

 

8.G.A.1 Verify experimentally the properties of rotations, reflections, and translations: a. Lines are taken to lines, and line segments to line segments of the same length. b. Angles are taken to angles of the same measure. c. Parallel lines are taken to parallel lines. 8.G.A.2 Describe the effect of dilations, translations, rotations, and reflections on two-dimensional figures using coordinates.

 

Seventh Grade:

 

Students will explore simple Probability.

 

7.SP.C.5 Understand that the probability of a chance event is a number between 0 and 1 that expresses the likelihood of the event occurring. Larger numbers indicate greater likelihood. A probability near 0 indicates an unlikely event, a probability around 1/2 indicates an event that is neither unlikely nor likely, and a probability near 1 indicates a likely event. 7.SP.C.6 Approximate the probability of a chance event by collecting data on the chance process that produces it and observing its long-run relative frequency, and predict the approximate relative frequency given the probability. For example, when rolling a number cube 600 times, predict that a 3 or 6 would be rolled roughly 200 times, but probably not exactly 200 times.


 


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  Website updated on: Sunday, April 15, 2018  
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